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Glossary
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 

A

Abrade
The process of removing the chrome finish from a steel shaft or the layer of paint from a graphite shaft prior to installation of the shaft into the head. Preferred abrading methods include sandpaper or a belt sander.


Accuracy
The ability to hit the ball toward the intended target; the dispersion pattern of shots hit consistently square on the clubface.


Acetone
Chemical used to bring ferrules to a high luster as a final step in assembly. Acetone is rubbed onto the ferrule with a rag or towel in order to obtain the luster. Air Hammer: Mechanical device, typically run by an air compressor, that forces a shaft into a head under high pressure. Air hammers are typically used in production line settings in which the manufacturer also crimps the shafts prior to installation. See "Crimp."


Allen Screw
Threaded screw used in weight ports present in certain wood heads. May also be known a hex screw or set screw.


Allen Wrench
Type of wrench used to install or remove Allen screws. Also known as a hex wrench.


Aluminum Oxide
Media used in sandblasting applications
of metal wood heads and iron faces. Also known as aluminum oxide sand. May also be used as shafting beads. (See Shafting Beads.)


Appendix II (Design of Clubs)
United States Golf Association (USGA) Rule Book section dealing specifically with regulations for the design of golf clubs.


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B

Backscrew
Steel pin or screw used to help secure a steel shaft to a wooden wood head. The backscrew is located on the back of the heel approximately 3⁄4" from the sole of the club.


Belt Sander (1" X 42")
Type of sander using a long (42"), thin (1") belt to abrade shafts and finish ferrules. The preferred type of sander in most shops, the 1" X 42" belt sander runs at 1725 rpm.


Belt Sander (1" X 30")
Type of belt sander using a 1" wide by 30" long belt to abrade shaft tips and attempt to turn ferrules. Acceptable for shaft work, but generally considered to be too fast for ferrule work. This sander runs at 3450 rpm.


Bench Grinder
Table-mounted machine often used to cut shafts prior to assembly. Used with two attachments; one commonly is a cut-off wheel and the other is a grinding or buffing wheel. Can also be set up with a belt sander attachment.


Bending Bar
Piece of equipment that fits over the hosel of a golf club during bending. Bars are available in many sizes and designs to accommodate various hosels.


Bend Point

Property of a shaft's point at which its maximum bending occurs while under a load (swing); typically designated as low, medium, and high. See Kick Point.


Big Butt Grip Installation Tool

An expandable plastic tool that helps to start the grip onto the butt of a large butt shaft. Grip installation on such shafts is very difficult without this tool.


Blind Bore

A bore configuration of metal woods in which the shaft penetrates the bore to a standard depth of 1/2" from the sole of the club head.


Bluing (Gun Bluing)
Process of applying finish to un-plated carbon steel putters or wedges. The resulting finish is a deep blue color and resists rust. Bluing is also the liquid used in the process itself.

Boring (Hosel Boring)
The process, using a drill or drill press, of enlarging the hosel bore of a wood, iron or putter.


Bore Type
The term used to describe how far a shaft penetrates into a club's hosel. See "Blind Bore", "Through Bore", "M1" and "M2."


Bore-through
Method of shaft insertion where shaft is inserted all of the way through the clubhead so that the tip of the shaft is visible on the sole of the club.


Bounce
Usually referred to when discussing wedge specifications, bounce is the description of one type of sole angle where the back edge of the sole is lower than the front edge. A bounce angle on the sole is what keeps wedges from digging too deep in the sandor getting stopped by tall grass. Measured in degrees, typical bounce angles range from 6 to 15.


Bounce Gauge
Specialized piece of equipment used to measure the bounce angle, bounce width and loft of an iron.


Build-Up Tape
Masking tape applied to the butt end of the shaft to increase grip size. A single layer of masking tape (.005" thick) will increase grip size approximately 1/64".


Bulge
The curve from heel to toe of a wood's clubface.


Bushing Ferrule
A type of ferrule that is used to reduce the size of metal wood hosel to .335" or .350" from a larger diameter or to reduce an iron hosel to .370" from a larger diameter. The bushing ferrule is epoxied into the hosel and then the shaft is installed as in a normal shafting operation


Butt (Shaft Butt)
The large end of the shaft onto which the grip is installed.


Butt Cap
The end of the grip of a golf club. Also the plastic or rubber cap used in certain leather and wrap grip applications. See also "End Cap."


Butt Diameter
The measure of the diameter of the larger end of a shaft, typically expressed in thousandths. (i.e., .600", .580", etc.)


Butt Section
The portion from the butt end of a shaft down to the first step (on steel shafts.)


Butt Size
Same as butt diameter; the measure of the diameter of the larger end of a shaft, typically expressed in thousandths.


Butt Trim
Term applied when cutting a shaft from its butt end.


Butt Weight

The process of adding weight to the butt end of the shaft, either by wrapping it with lead tape or by installing a lead insert into the shaft butt. The "Butt Weight" is also the term given to the weight placed inside the butt of the shaft.


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C

Calipers
Measuring device commonly used to measure the diameters of grips and shafts. Calipers may be used to accurately measure other specifications of clubs as well.


Cast
Clubhead manufacturing process that involves making the head by heating steel until it is liquefied and then poured into a pre-formed mold known as a "cast". Once cooled, the cast is removed and the club head treated to it's desired finish.


Cermet
Material used in clubhead design made from a composition of boron carbide ceramic particles mixed with metal.


Chamfer

Generic term used to describe the process of using a special tool to "countersink", "radius" or "cone" the inside of a hosel in order to help provide a measure of protection, particularly for a graphite shaft.


Chop Saw
A motorized saw used in larger shops to cut numerous shafts at one time. Clean and Dip: Process of using steel wool or light sandpaper on a wooden wood head followed by the application of a coat of polyurethane in order to bring the club back to a "shiny" finish.


Clone
A golf club which resemble popular OEM models to the point of attempting to make the consumer think that the club is the real thing.


Cone
Generic term used to describe the process of using a special tool to "countersink" or "radius" the inside of a hosel in order to help provide a measure of protection, particularly for a graphite shaft.


Core (Grip)
The inside diameter measurement of a grip. Typically core sizes match shaft butt sizes. For example, an M60 grip core will match with a .600" shaft butt size and produce a standard size grip.


Counter Balance
The process of adding weight in the butt end of a shaft to achieve a specific swingweight and/or feel. Counter balancing will increase the overall weight of the club and is not a widely recommended procedure.


Countersink
The action of using a special tool to radius the inside of a hosel in order to help provide a measure of protection, particularly for a graphite shaft. Typically heads are countersunk at a 20-degree angle. The term "countersink" may also be used to describe the tool used (in a drill or drill press) to create the countersink.


Crimp
The mechanical process of "punching" two or more places on a shaft tip in order to make it fit more securely into a hosel. Crimping is done in high volume production lines and is only used (in conjunction with an air hammer) for steel shaft applications.


Crimper
The tool, typically run from an air compressor, used to crimp shafts.


Crown
The top of a wood's head.


Curved Shaft
A shaft, usually steel or aluminum, designed for use in no-hosel putters, that features a bend or bends no more than 5" from the shaft tip. The curved shaft tends to create offset and possibly face balancing on putters with no hosels.


Cutting Oil
Lubricating oil used to reduce heat during the boring of steel hosels. Also called "Drilling Oil."


Cycles Per Minute (CPM)

The common measurement units when discussing the frequency of a shaft.


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D

Deep Bore
A model of wood or iron whose hosel bore depth exceeds 1 1/2". Titleist's titanium drivers are examples of deep bore heads.


Dimple
The mechanical process of "punching" two or more places on a shaft tip in order to make it fit more securely into a hosel. See "Crimp."


Dimpler
Machine used to dimple a shaft. See "Crimper."


Discrete Flex
A shaft having a specific flex designation. For example, True Temper's Dynamic Gold™ S300 is a discrete flex shaft, while the company's parallel tipped Dynamic™ shaft is not.


Distance
How far the ball goes when hit consistently on the clubface.


Double Sided Tape
Also known as "two-way tape" or "grip tape", special tape (3/4" or 2" wide) that is adhesive on both sides. Applied to the shaft, one side holds the tape to the shaft; the other, when activated with solvent, secures the grip to the shaft. Dowel: Wooden rod used to add length to a golf shaft. A dowel is inserted into the butt of the shaft, epoxied in place, and cut to a desired length to increase the overall length of a club to a recommended maximum of 1 1⁄2".


Drilling Oil
Lubricating fluid (also known as cutting oil) used to reduce heat when boring steel hosels.


Driving Plug
Steel rod, with a recessed section, slightly smaller than a shaft butt, placed into the shaft butt and then struck with a hammer in order to seat the shaft to the bottom of the hosel when assembling a club.


Dry(ing) Box
Enclosed container, usually made of wood, that contains a light bulb(s) or other source of heat. Used to accelerate the curing time of finishes and epoxies.


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E

Easy (E-Z) Out
Threaded steel rod inserted into a shaft broken off at the hosel. The threads lock onto the shaft, making it removable after the application of heat. See also "Shaft Extractor."


Emery Cake
Type of compound used, along with an unstitched buffing wheel, to remove deep nicks and scratches from a steel surface. It is considered to have heavy cutting action.


End Cap
The end of the grip of a golf club. Also the plastic or rubber cap used in certain leather and wrap grip applications. The same as "Butt Cap."


Epoxy
Two-part adhesive used to secure golf shafts to heads, among other clubmaking operations. See also "24-Hour Cure Epoxy", "Quick-Set Epoxy" and "Five-Minute" Epoxy."


Extending Shafts

The process of using a piece of material inserted into the shaft to make the club longer. The portion of the extender inside the shaft holds it in place (with epoxy), while the portion sticking out of the shaft butt will make the club longer, up to 1 1⁄2".


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F

Face Insert
The center portion of the face, typically constructed from epoxy, graphite, fiber or some type of softer material. Effective with a 1992 USGA ruling, all types of woods, irons and putters may have face inserts.


Face Progression
The measurement from a shaft's centerline to the front of the club face.


Face Radius Gauge
Four-sided gauge used to measure the bulge and roll of a club face. Each side of the gauge has a particular radius, for example, 9", 11", etc. When the side of the gauge matches the radius of the face, the bulge or roll is identified.


Face Screw
Aluminum, brass or steel screw(s) used to help secure face inserts into wooden or graphite wood heads.


Feel
The sensation and feedback provided by the club to the golfer.


Ferrule
The decorative trim ring, usually black (It may have additional trim colors.), that is found directly on top of the hosel on many woods and irons.


Ferrule Depth Setting Tool
Tool (often shaped like an aluminum block) used to help a clubmaker properly locate (set) the ferrule in the proper place on the shaft prior to assembly.


Ferrule Turning Belt
Used in conjunction with a belt sander, a belt made of linen fibers used to finish ferrules on woods and irons. May also be called a "Linen Belt."


First Step
The step on a steel shaft closest to the tip of the shaft.


Five-Minute Epoxy
Type of epoxy designed to cure very rapidly, in a time of approximately five minutes. Not recommended for shafting applications; see "Quick Set Epoxy."


Flat Line Frequency
A method of frequency matching in which all of the woods or irons in the set maintain the same frequency. When plotted on a graph, the frequencies appear as a straight line.


Flat Line Oscillation

Process of making all of the shafts in a set of clubs the same frequency, either in raw or assembled form. See FLO.


Flex
The common term given to the relative bending properties of a golf club shaft. Flex is usually identified by a letter: L for Ladies, A for Senior, R for Regular, S for Stiff and X for Extra Stiff. As a guideline, a player should use the most flexible shaft that they can control.


Flex Point
See Kick Point.


FLO: Flat Line Oscillation

Process of making all of the shafts in a set of clubs the same frequency, either in raw or assembled form.


48" Drill Bit
Special long drill bit used to cut through the backscrew during the removal of a steel shaft from a wooden or graphite-headed wood.


48" Ruler

Aluminum ruler used to measure raw lengths of shafts and total length of golf clubs when they are held in their playing position. May also be used for various other shop measurements.


Forged
Clubhead manufacturing process that involves making the head from a single solid piece of steel that is heated and then formed into the desired shape.


Forgiveness
The club's ability to minimize the effects of off center hits.


Frequency
The number of oscillations of a golf shaft in a given time when the tip is pulled down and the shaft vibrates in a specialized machine. Frequency is measured in cycles per minute (cpm's.)


Frequency Analyzer
Specialized machine used to measure the frequencies of golf clubs and shafts. Used in the frequency matching process. May also be known as a frequency machine.


Frequency Matching
The process of ensuring that all of the clubs in a given set are matched by their shaft frequency. Frequency matched clubs are said to be more consistent in both feel and performance.


Frequency Slope
The graph line formed when plotting the frequencies of the shafts in a set of clubs. A well-matched slope-frequency set will have a consistent slope; a mismatched set will show shafts that vary several cycles from their expected range.


Frequency Spec Shaft

A shaft of known frequency used to calibrate/compare frequency machines.


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G

Gear Effect
The spin created by the bulge in a wood when the ball is struck near the toe or heel. If a ball is hit near the toe, the spin is counterclockwise. If the ball is hit near the heel, the spin is clockwise.


Glanz Wach (Wax)
Compound used along with a buffing wheel to create a high luster finish on a polyurethane coated wood or metal wood.


Glass Beads

.002" (or similar size) glass beads that, when mixed with epoxy, help center a shaft in a hosel.


Graphite Shaft Remover (Extractor)
Generic term given to any one of a number of tools designed to remove a graphite shaft from a steel or titanium head without damaging either head or shaft.


Grind
Refers to the additional shaping of the clubhead to meet the user's desired specifications. Many professional and top amateur golfers take a standard OEM head and "grind" the sole to alter the bounce angle or shape the club's toe until they are happy with the club's performance and cosmetics.


Grip Collar
Plastic collar used to secure the bottom of a leather or wrap grip in place on the shaft.


Grip Core

The internal diameter of a grip as measured in thousandths. For example, a grip with a .600" core is called an M60 grip.


Grip Gauge

Aluminum or plastic gauge used to determine a shaft or grip diameter. It sees limited use in most shops as it only has a few specifically sized openings used for identification.


Grip Mouth

The opening at the small end of the grip. The mouth will have a code (i.e., M60) indicating the size of the grip (men's grip for a .600" shaft.)


Grip Remover Gun

Tool utilizing a canister and needle system to inject solvent into a grip to facilitate its removal.


Grip Rip
Tool used to quickly remove a grip using a fixed position knife blade. The grip to be removed is pulled through the Grip Rip for fast and efficient removal.


Grip Tape
Also known as "two-way tape" or "double-sided tape", special tape that is adhesive on both sides. Applied to the shaft, one side holds the tape to the shaft; the other, when activated with solvent, secures the grip to the shaft. May be 3/4" or 2" wide. Grip Tape Remover Tool: Time saving tool that strips tape from shafts after grip removal.


Grit Edge Blade
Type of blade installed in a hacksaw that is used to cut graphite shafts without splintering them.


Groove Tool
Carbide tipped tool used to deepen grooves on irons.


Gun Bluing
Process of applying finish to un-plated carbon steel putters. The resulting finish is a deep blue color and resists rust. Bluing is also the liquid used in the process itself.


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H

Heat Gun
Electrical device producing a flow of heated air that is used to break an epoxy bond during repair. The heat gun is usually used in conjunction with some type of specialized shaft removal device, such as a shaft puller. (See "Shaft Puller.") Also used to make ferrule removal easier.


Heating (Hot) Rod
Steel rod, usually with a wooden handle, that is heated and then inserted into a club's hosel in order to break the epoxy bond between head and shaft.


Hosel
The entry point of the shaft into the head on any golf club.


Hook Blade Knife

Utility-type knife with curved blade designed to prevent graphite shaft damage during grip removal.


Hosel Adapter
Generic term applied to any type of bushing or replacement hosel for a wood or an iron. The hosel adapter reduces the size of the hosel opening so that a smaller diameter shaft can be installed. Special hosel adapters can also take the place of the Thermoplastic hosel of Ping drivers during reshafting.


Hosel Boring
The process of enlarging a hosel bore (wood, iron or putter) through drilling.


Hosel Brush
Thin metallic brush used to clean debris (old epoxy, etc.) from hosels.


Hosel Rivet
Aluminum or steel rivet (pin) used in certain models of irons (most notably Hogans, First Flights and older MacGregors) to help secure the shaft in place. A hole was drilled through the hosel and shaft and the rivet pounded into place.


Hyde Knife

Heavy-duty knife used to cut off grips, clean shafts, open boxes, etc.


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I

In-Hosel
The common shaft-to-head installation in which the shaft penetrates into the hosel. Used on woods, irons and putters.


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J


K

Kick Point
The specific point on a shaft where most of the flex occurs. In general the following characteristics apply: low kick point - higher ball flight, easier to control, less distance; mid kick point - medium ball flight, combination of power and accuracy; high kick point - lower ball flight, more difficult to control; more distance.


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L

Lie
The angle, measured in degrees, of the club's shaft when the club is set in the address position as measured from the shaft to the sole of the clubhead. Iron sets typically range from 57 degrees (2 iron) to 64 degrees (SW).


Loft
The angle, measured in degrees, of the clubhead's face when the club is soled properly. Driver lofts typically range from 6 to 12 degrees, fairway woods from 13 to 28 degrees and irons from 18 (2 iron) to 61 degrees (LW).


Low Profile
A design feature popular in fairway woods in which the face height of the club is generally 1.2" or less. This provides a lower center of gravity for the club.


Large Butt Shaft
Any shaft with a butt diameter of over .620".


Lead Powder

Material used to swingweight steel-shafted clubs after shaft installation, but prior to grip installation. The powder is poured into the hosel until the desired weight is achieved and then is held in place by a cork.


Lead Tape
Used for temporary (or permament) weighting on heads. Usually found in 1/2" widths, the adhesive-backed tape is applied to clubheads for added weight. A 4" length of the 1⁄2" wide tape adds @1 swingweight to a club.


Lead Tip Pin (Tip Weight)
A short piece of lead that is epoxied into a shaft from the tip end prior to shaft installation. Tip pins are a means of swingweighting both steel and graphite-shafted clubs, but are more commonly used with graphite shafts.


Light Weight Shaft
A weight classification of shaft that falls within 3.80-4.24 ounces in steel or alloy shafts and within 3.20-3.60 ounces related to composite shafts.


Linen Belt

Used in conjunction with a belt sander, a belt made of linen fibers used to finish ferrules on woods and irons. May also be called a "ferrule turning belt."


Locktite Shaft Holder
Type of shaft holder, made of aluminum or steel, used to tightly secure a club in a vise, usually for steel reshaft procedures. It holds a shaft very securely, but may damage the shaft due to the high pressure at which it is designed to work. Not for use with graphite shafts.


Lorythmic Swingweight Scale
A type of swingweight scale that measures swingweight at a point 14" down from the butt end of the club and displays those measurements in letter/number designations (D-1, D-2, etc.)


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M


Maraging Steel
Material used in clubhead design with increased amounts of nickel allowing the steel to undergo advanced heating techniques achieving a hardness greater than titanium.


M1 Bore
Bore type in a wood in which there is 1 1⁄2" from the ground line to the point at which the shaft bottoms out in the hosel. May also be called "standard bore" or "metal wood bore."


M2 Bore
Type of wood bore in which the shaft bottoms out in the hosel 1" from the ground line.


Metal Wood Bore
The bore configuration of a type of metal wood head in which the standard distance from the groundline to the bottom of the bore is 1 1/2".


Moisture Cure Polyurethane
Type of polyurethane that relies on moisture in the air for its curing properties. Considered difficult to use because of this, moisture cure polyurethane is characterized by its clear, high-gloss appearance after application.


Mortite
Adhesive, rope-like material used to form a dam around the face insert of a wooden wood prior to using pour in place insert epoxy.


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N


Nylon Deburring Wheel
Attachment (approximately 5 1⁄2" in diameter) to a bench grinder or similar machine that is used to remove small bits of metal from a golf club head or shaft tip. Commonly used to remove any sharp edges from steel shafts during through-bore reshafting procedures.


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O

OEM
Original Equipment Manufacturer such as Ping, Titleist, and Callaway.


Official Swingweight scale
A type of swingweight scale that uses a 12" fulcrum as its measuring point, providing balance in ounces and total weight in ounces or grams. Not typically used in many shops.


Oil Modified Polyurethane
Type of polyurethane used by most clubmakers, it cures from the bottom layer of finish to the top. Characterized by its slight amber color, it requires no special humidity-controlled conditions.


Overall Weight
Also known as total weight or static weight, total weight is the weight of the entire assembled club as expressed in ounces or grams.


Over-Hosel
Type of shaft-to-head assembly in which the shaft fits over a post protruding from the head. Not nearly as common as in-hosel assemblies, over-hosel applications are used on irons and putters only.


Oversize Hosel
Any metal wood hosel larger than .335" or any iron hosel larger than .370" is considered to be an oversize hosel.


Oversize Shaft Tip
An iron shaft with a tip larger than .370" or a wood with a tip larger than .335". Certain manufacturers claim that larger tip diameter shafts will assist in the stabilization of club heads, especially on off-center impacts.


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P


Parallel
See Unitized.


Parallel Tip Section
Section of shaft toward the tip that exhibits one constant diameter up to the first step.


Parallel Tip Shaft
The type of shaft construction in which the shaft has one constant diameter in its tip section. .370" is a common tip size for parallel tip iron shafts, while .335" is common for wood shafts. Parallel tip shafts can often be used in any club in a set; the same shaft can be used to assemble a #1 iron or an SW. Parallel tip shafts are favored by clubmakers, although a number of OEM's use them as well.


Peaking
Proprietary method of shaft testing and installation.


Phillips Head Screw

Type of screw, as identified by its head pattern, used on certain soleplates and wooden wood face insert screws. Phillips screws are identified by their radiused screw pattern and blunt edges.


Proprietary
Any feature of a golf club that is unique to a particular manufacturer. For example, each manufacturer's head or shaft designs are proprietary to that manufacturer. Proprietary designs, logos, etc. are often patented by the company developing them in order to secure their exclusive use for a given time period.


Prorhythmic Swingweight Scale

A type of swingweight scale that bases its measurements on a 14" fulcrum system, additionally providing weights in ounces or grams.


Pour In Place Insert
Epoxy-based mixture used to replace broken or missing inserts in wooden wood. Requires a 24-hour curing time and may be any one of many colors.


Propane Torch
Hand-held torch, fueled by propane, used to heat metal hosels in order to break the epoxy bond between head and shaft.


Pry Bar
Tool used in the most economic method of graphite shaft removal. The pry bar applies force to the club head as the shaft is held in a vise by a vinyl shaft clamp. Pressure from the bar forces the head from the club when the epoxy bond breaks from the application of heat.


Pured
A shaft that has been spine-aligned following the patented spinning process. A shaft that is pured will be placed in a club in its neutral position in accordance with USGA Rules.


Puring
The process of aligning a shaft so that it is in its neutral position in a club.


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Q


R

Ram Rod
Long (@48") thin (@3/8") rod used to force a cork down a steel shaft when using lead powder as a swingweight material.


Reamer
Type of drill bit used to enlarge a hosel to one uniform parallel tip diameter.


Reed and Prince Screw

Type of screw, as identified by its head pattern, used on certain soleplates and wooden wood face insert screws. Reed and Prince screws are identified by their squared screw pattern edges.


Refinish
The process of applying a completely new finish to a wooden or metal wood. The refinish involves removing the old finish prior to applying the new finish.


Relative Stiffness

The stiffness of a shaft when compared to another shaft or shafts.


Regrip
The process of installing a new grip onto a club.


Reset Insert, Soleplate or Backweight, etc.
The process of removing and re-epoxying (and perhaps re-installing screws) any loose part of the head as indicated.


Reshaft
The process of installing a new shaft into a club head.


Ribbed Grip
A grip that has a raised section along the length of the back of the grip. Certain players believe a ribbed grip will help them maintain uniform hand position on all clubs in the set.


Rouge
Compound used in conjunction with a stitched buffing wheel to polish marks from a stainless head. Available in white and red (finer) compounds, rouge is typically used to create a high luster on a club head.


Round Grip
A grip that tapers uniformly the entire distance along its length and has no discernible ribs. Most low handicappers prefer round grips.


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S

Sandblast
Finish applied to the faces and cavities of certain irons. Metal wood heads may also have sandblasted finishes. Characterized by a light gray color, these finishes are applied through the use of an air compressor and special sandblast gun. The common media used for sandblasting is aluminum oxide sand. "Sandblast" is also the term given to the process of applying a sandblast finish.


Sandblasting Cabinet
Box-like cabinet with a "window" and "arm-holes" used for sandblasting. The purpose of the cabinet is to eliminate flying sand and to allow the club to be easily held and manipulated during the sandblasting process.


Sanding Belts
Long, thin belts or various grits (#120, 240, etc.) used in conjunction with 1" X 42" or 1" X 30" belt sanders.


Sanding Cone (Drum)
Attachment for a motor or specializes sanding station. Cone or cylindrically (drum) shaped and covered with sandpaper held in place by two-way tape; used to remove finishes from wood heads.


Satin Finish
Type of finish applied to stainless steel iron heads and metal wood soles through a series of finishing belts or wheels.


Scotchbrite (Surebrite) Wheel

Type of wheel, approximately 5 1⁄2" in diameter, mounted on a bench grinder or similar setup, used to return a club's finish to satin. Typically used on metal wood soleplates or satin-finished irons to restore their finish.


Scriber
Tool (approximately 6" long) with wooden or plastic handle and sharp metallic point used to clean out screw holes, engravings, etc.


Shaft Cutting Board
Wooden or metal board, usually attached to a chop saw that measures and cuts a number of shafts at one time. Usually found in higher volume shops.


Shaft Cutoff Wheel

Abrasive wheel attached to a bench grinder to efficiently cut shafts one at a time.


Shaft Extension
A piece of material inserted into the shaft butt that is used to make the club longer. The portion of the extender inside the shaft holds it in place (with epoxy), while the portion sticking out of the shaft butt will make the club longer, up to 1 1⁄2". The extension may be made of wood, steel, aluminum or graphite.


Shaft Extractor
Threaded steel rod inserted into a shaft broken off at the hosel. The threads lock onto the shaft, making it removable after the application of heat. May also be called and "Easy Out."


Shaft Identification (ID) Gauge
Rectangular aluminum gauge (approximately 3" X 5") used to measure shaft tip sizes and step patterns. Helpful in identifying shaft types and tip diameters.


Shaft Pattern
The design of a particular shaft, indicating the distribution of flexibility about the shaft. Pattern is also the term used to designate a particular model of shaft, e.g., Dynamic™, Dynalite™, Rifle™, etc.


Shaft Puller
Specialized tool used in the removal of graphite shafts from steel or titanium club heads. The puller is designed to force the head from the shaft at the precise moment the epoxy bond is broken by heating. The concept of a shaft puller is to reduce the number of damaged graphite shafts as they are removed.


Shafting Beads
Small nylon (or other non-abrasive material) beads, when mixed with epoxy, that help center a shaft in a hosel. (See also Glass Beads.)


Shanked Ferrule
Ferrule, with a raised lip at its top, used in conjunction with wooden woods. The "shank" or lip, helps clubmakers begin the whipping without slippage.


Shear Strength
Resistance of material (i.e., epoxy) to being broken or torn apart.


Shim
Thin metallic or paper wedge used to center a shaft in a hosel. The use of shims is not a highly recommend practice among clubmakers.


Short-Shafting
The process of installing a shaft short of the bottom of the hosel bore. In effect this makes the shaft play softer than it was designed to play. Most common in deep bore metal heads.


Skiving

The thin edges on the underside of a leather or other wrap-on grip, making the grip easier to wrap in place.


Slope frequency
As per Frequency Slope; The graph line formed when plotting the frequencies of the shafts in a set of clubs. A well-matched set will have a consistent slope; a mismatched set will show shafts that vary several cycles from their expected range.


Soft-Stepping
A process of assembly in which a shaft with a longer tip section is put into a club that would normally require a shorter tip section in order that the club play to a softer flex. Installing a #2 iron shaft into a #3 iron to gain more flexibility is an example of this process.


Spec Shaft
A shaft of known frequency used to calibrate/compare frequency machines.


Specification (Specs) Gauge
A specialized piece of equipment used to measure a club's loft, lie, face angle, offset and face progression.


Spine Alignment
Process of locating a shaft's spine and positioning it either toward or away from the target in a club in accordance with USGA Rules.


Spining
Proprietary method of shaft testing and installation.


Spine
One name given to a point on a shaft in which it exhibits uniform bending properties in relation to the target.


Standard Weight Shaft
A steel shaft weight classification that falls within the range of 4.25-4.62 ounces.


Static Weight
Also known as overall weight or total weight, total weight is the weight of the entire assembled club as expressed in ounces or grams.


Step
Location on a steel shaft where the diameter of the shaft "steps up" noticeably to a larger diameter. The average steel shaft has numerous steps arranged in a pattern unique to that shaft's specific model allowing clubmakers to distinguish one unmarked shaft from another.


Stepless

Term describing a steel shaft that contains no "steps up" in diameter, making instead the transition from thin to thicker in a smooth, gradual manner.


Step Drilling

A method of enlarging the bore of a hosel through the use of a series of drill bits. The process is begun with the smallest bit, then progresses to a medium sized bit, followed by a larger sized bit. Step drilling makes the process of enlarging a hosel bore easier and less time-consuming.


Stitched Buffing Wheel
Type of wheel (approximately 6" in diameter) used, along with a bench grinder and Emery Cake, Tripoli or Rouge compounds, to polish stainless steel heads. The wheel is identified by its fibers stitched tightly together.


Subflex
In the True temper stiff Dynamic Gold series, for example, each individual flex. S200, S300 & S400 are all subflexes of stiff, for example.


Surebrite (Scotchbrite) Wheel
Type of wheel used on a bench grinder or similar setup used to return a club's finish to satin. Typically used on metal wood soleplates or satin-finished irons to restore their finish.


Swaging

A method, used in shaft manufacture, in which the tip of the shaft is elongated in order to make it a specific smaller diameter.


Swingweight
A club's weight distribution around a fixed fulcrum point. The fulcrum point is typically 14" from the butt of the club. Swingweight is commonly referred to as the relationship between the weight of the grip end of the club and head end. It is measured in alpha-numeric units such as D-1, D-2, and so on with higher letter-number units indicating more weight in the head relative to the grip.


Swingweight Scale
A measuring scale specific to golf clubs that utilizes a balance system to determine the swingweight and possibly the total weight of a golf club.


Symetrical Shaft
A shaft which exhibits uniform oscillation.


Symmetry
Property of a shaft in which it oscillates in a uniform manner.


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T

Tapered
Design characteristic of a shaft whose sides angle (taper) in at the tip end.


Taper Tip Shaft
One of a number of shafts manufactured with a tip section that varies in length and thickness below the first step. This type of shaft requires that a specific length, known as a discreet length, shaft be made for each club in a set.


Tensile Strength
Resistance of a material (i.e., epoxy) to being stretched or elongated.


Thermoplastic Hosel
The hosel of a golf club that is produced from some type of thermoplastic material, allowing it to be constructed to produce specific lie and face angles. Ping developed this type of hosel for proprietary use in its titanium drivers.


Thermoset

An epoxy based material that, once formed, cannot be re-shaped or re-formed.


Through-Bore (Thru-Bore) Plug

Plastic or wooden plug inserted into the shaft tip in through-bore shaft applications to cosmetically finish the shaft tip.


Tip Diameter
The outside diameter of a shaft tip (in thousandths) as measured at the very tip of the shaft.


Tip Pin
A short piece of lead (2-8 grams) that is inserted into a shaft from the tip end prior to shaft installation. Tip pins are a means of swingweighting both steel and graphite-shafted clubs, but are more commonly used with graphite shafts.


Tip Size
The outside diameter of a shaft tip as measured at the very tip of the shaft. See also "Tip Diameter."


Tip To First Step
Measurement used by certain companies to assist in shaft trimming. The "Tip To First Step" measurement is simply the distance from the shaft tip to the first step.


Tip Trim
Term given to the process of cutting a shaft from the tip end.


Tip Weight
A short piece of lead or tungsten (2-8 grams) that is inserted into a shaft from the tip end prior to shaft installation.


Tipping (or Tip Trimming)

The process of trimming a shaft from the tip to increase its stiffness.


Titanium
Material used in clubhead and shaft design which has a higher strength to weight ratio than steel allowing larger and lighter design.


Torque
The resistance of a shaft to twisting is its torque. Lower torque shafts twist less than do higher torque shafts and, as a result, may be recommended for stronger players. Torque is also used to define the relationship between the turning of the upper and lower body during the swing.


Total Weight

Also known as overall weight or static weight, total weight is the weight of the entire assembled club as expressed in ounces or grams.


Tour Weighted
The somewhat generic term applied to composite shafts that weigh approximately the same as standard weight steel shafts (@125 grams.)


Trajectory

The height and path of the ball when hit consistently on the clubface.


Trim Ring

Small plastic ring found at the top of certain ferrules. Trim rings, decorative in nature, may be any number of colors.


Tripoli

Compound used in conjunction with a stitched buffing wheel to polish marks from a stainless head. Medium cutting action.


Tubing (Shaft) Cutter
Hand operated tool used to cut steel shaft tips and butts. Using the tool is very labor-intensive; it is used strictly for small-volume shops.


Tungsten (Tungsten Weight)

A heavy metallic compound used to add weight to a club head, either as a swingweighting material in the shaft or as a defined weight attached somewhere in/on the head. May be in the form of powder or encapsulated in tip weights.


Two-Way Tape
Also known as "double-sided tape" or "grip tape", special tape that is adhesive on both sides. Applied to the shaft, one side holds the tape to the shaft; the other, when activated with solvent, secures the grip to the shaft. Two-Way Tape may is available in 3/4" or 2" widths.


24-Hour Cure Epoxy
Type of epoxy with a high shear strength (at least 2400 psi) used to secure shafts to heads for the strongest, longest-lasting type of bond.


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U

Ultralight Shaft
A class of composite shafts that weigh less than 2.00 ounces or 65 grams.


Underlisting
The rubber or paper material onto which a leather or wrap grip is installed.


Unitized
Design characteristic of a shaft whose sides are parallel at the tip end.; A shaft in which one model can be used to build one entire set of irons or one model may be used to build a full set of woods through successive trimming of the shaft tip section.


Unstitched Buffing Wheel
Type of wheel (approximately 6" in diameter) used along with a bench grinder and Glanz Wach to add a high luster to polyurethane-coated club heads.


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V

Very Lightweight Shaft
A weight classification of shafts that falls within 3.40-3.79 ounce weight range for steel or alloy shafts and 2.00-3.19 ounces for composite shafts.


Vinyl Shaft Clamp
Type of clamp used to hold a club in a vise. The clamp holds the club by the shaft; the fact it is made of vinyl (or rubber) prevents damage to the shaft.


Vise Clamp
Tool, typically made from aluminum, that offers maximum gripping power to secure a club in a vise, generally during shaft removal.


Vise Pad(s)

Typically made of wood covered by thick felt or from a hard rubber material, vise pads are used to secure a club head in a vise during repair.


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W

Weight-Sorted
Club components (heads, shafts or grips) that are weighed prior to assembly in an attempt to ensure consistent specification of the finished golf club.


Whipping
Black thread (typically nylon) applied over the neck of a wooden wood to prevent the neck from splitting during play.


Whipping Cover
Plastic cover installed over the string whipping (the protective plastic-coated string found on wooden wood hosels) on certain woods. Common on Wilson woods of the 1960's and 70's.


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